There’s a lot of confusion around this topic. For years, we have been told that oats are not gluten-free and that wheat gluten intolerant people and coeliacs should avoid oats completely. In Australia there are no ‘gluten-free’ oats, however in other countries there are and some recipes call for ‘gluten-free’ oats. Why is this? While it is true that oats do contain gluten, it’s a different type of gluten to the other gluten-containing grains. Let me explain.

What type of gluten is in oats then?

Gluten represents a specific number of proteins found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye, oats, and triticale. Spelt is an “heirloom” variety of wheat and should be considered as “wheat” for the purpose of this article. The types of proteins that make up gluten is different from grain to grain. For example, the “gluten” protein in wheat is Gliadin, in barley it’s Hordein, in Rye it’s Secalin, in Triticale (a wheat-rye hybrid) it is both Secalin and Gliadin. In oats, the gluten protein is called Avenin also known as ‘Oat Gluten’.

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Delicious, wholesome and healthy! What more could you want from an easy and fool-proof banana bread recipe that everyone can eat? Using gluten-free oat flour instead of the traditional wheat flour, and dairy-free milk makes this banana bread easier to digest, less allergenic for those of us wheat, gluten and dairy intolerant folks and it’s full of dietary fibre! Plus it tastes so healthy! I made this for my partner for the first time and he closed his eyes on the first bite and said OMG this is awesome!

Make sure your oats are gluten-free if you are wheat or gluten intolerant, and if you are one of the few coeliac people who cannot tolerate GF oats, please use gluten-free plain flour instead. You could also use gluten-free self-raising flour but you would need to omit the baking powder. I have made this recipe before with a mixture of flours- 1 ½ cups of oat flour and half a cup of GF plain flour which was nice too. If you don’t have milk on hand, you could probably add water instead. It’s not overly sweet as it is but you could omit the coconut sugar or honey for an even healthier sugar-free banana bread! You can serve it with butter if you can eat dairy which is to die for, drizzle with almond butter or a sugar-free jam. It’s also just as delicious by itself!

If you are coeliac and unsure if you can tolerate GF oats, read our article ‘Are oats gluten-free?’ Click here. Please check with your practitioner for advice.

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Did you know that most household cleaning and personal care products on the market contain toxic chemicals?

Are you aware that many of these products also contain chemicals that haven’t been tested for safety?

Many people without realising it are using chemicals every day in their homes and on their bodies that are harmful to their health and their families. They are also bad for the environment.

Many people recycle their rubbish but don’t realise that the water leaving their house is far more toxic than the water that comes into their home. Why is this? Detergents, soaps, shampoo, cleaning and many other products contain toxic chemicals that get washed down the drain into the waterways and environment, polluting the plants, animals and threatening the entire ecosystem.

Most dishwashing liquids, laundry detergents, shampoos, soaps, moisturisers, toothpaste, makeup and many other self-care products being sold on the shelves today contain toxic chemicals such as fragrance, parabens, PEGs/Ceteareth/Polyethylene compounds, phthalates, triclosan, Vitamin A compounds (retinyl palmitate, retinyl acetate, retinol) and many others. The following are just some of the common but worst chemicals as they have been proven to cause serious health problems:

Fragrance:

Also called ‘parfum’, can contain dozens of chemicals under the name ‘fragrance’. The law doesn’t require companies to list what chemicals are in their fragrance on the product label. Fragrance is in the top 5 allergens in the world and is linked with allergies, dermatitis and respiratory distress. Commonly found in cleaning products, dishwashing and laundry detergents, shampoo, moisturiser, perfume, cosmetics, grooming products and many others.

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